Parenting

Part 8: How did Jesus discipline?

The word “discipline” is the same root word as the word “disciple.”  Let’s explore 12 ways that Jesus disciplined His disciples.

  1. Teaching – Just as God has compassion on His children, Jesus was also known for His compassion on sinners. This verse tells us that when Jesus felt compassion on the crowd, He demonstrated His compassion on them by teaching them.

    When Jesus went ashore, He saw a large crowd, and He felt compassion for them because they were like sheep without a shepherdand He began to teach them many things.  (Mark 6:34)

  2. Modeling – Jesus taught His disciples to pray, to live, and to love through modeling.  He was the perfect example for them (and for us) to follow.

    For I gave you an example that you also should do as I did to you. (John 13:15)

  3. Serving – Jesus did not lead His disciples the way the rest of the world’s leaders do. He did not come to be served but to serve others and to give His life for us.  He served His disciples to teach them to serve others.

    So Jesus called them together and said, “You know that the rulers in this world lord it over their people, and officials flaunt their authority over those under them.  
    But among you it will be different. Whoever wants to be a leader among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first among you must be the slave of everyone else.  For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom for many.”  (Mark 10:42-45)

  4. Forgiving – Jesus taught His disciples to forgive others by forgiving them.  He did not hold their sins against them.  He did not throw their past crimes in their faces.  He gave them the gift of a clean slate.  Relationships are broken through sin, but relationships are restored through forgiveness.

    Then Jesus said to her, “Your sins are forgiven.”  (Luke 7:48)
  5. Loving – God is love, therefore Jesus is the living representation of love.  Jesus loved His disciples just as God loved Him.  He loved His disciples by giving His life for them – even when they did not deserve it.


    As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Abide in my love.  (John 15:9)

    But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.  (Romans 5:8)

  6. Being Patient – Jesus was extremely patient with his disciples.  He patiently endured their constant questions (Matthew 17:10), their lack of understanding (Matthew 15:16), their overwhelming needs (Matthew 15:29-31)… sound familiar, parents of toddlers?

    “Love is patient…” (1 Corinthians 13:4a)

  7. Extending Grace – Jesus did not deal with people according to the law or their mistakes or their sins.  He extended grace – over and over and over.  Jesus ultimately extended grace to His disciples when He gave His life in their place.  Instead of giving them the punishment that they deserved, He took their punishment for them (in the same way my own father did for me).

    For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.  (John 1:17)

  8. Rebuking – Jesus also rebuked his disciples.  Ironically, the word “rebuke” in Greek is the word “epitimao.”  It means “to reprove, to censure severely, to charge sharply.”  It also means “to honor.”   Jesus was not afraid to tell his disciples sternly when they were wrong.  However, notice that Jesus did not rebuke His disciples for differences in personal preferences, but rather He rebuked them for not concerning themselves with the things that matter to God.

    But turning around and seeing His disciples, He rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind Me, Satan; for you are not setting your mind on God’s interests, but man’s.”  (Mark 8:33)

  9. Correcting – Jesus corrected lies with the truth.  He corrected false doctrine and false teaching.  Jesus not only corrected belief, He also corrected behavior.  Once, He even corrected two bickering disciples by giving them the example of a child!

    “You have heard that it was said, ‘YOU SHALL LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR and hate your enemy.’
      
    But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,  (Matthew 5:43-44)


    An argument started among them as to which of them might be the greatest. 
     But Jesus, knowing what they were thinking in their heart, took a child and stood him by His side, and said to them, “Whoever receives this child in My name receives Me, and whoever receives Me receives Him who sent Me; for the one who is least among all of you, this is the one who is great.”  (Luke 9:46-48)

  10. Instructing – Jesus also took the time to instruct His disciples.  He gave them instructions on prayer (Luke 11:1-13) and fasting (Matthew 6:16-18).  His instructions were specific (Matthew 21:1-7) and clear (Matthew 10:1-15).

    The disciples went and did just as Jesus had instructed them…  (Matthew 21:6)When Jesus had finished instructing his twelve disciples, he went on from there to teach and preach in their cities.  (Matthew 11:1)

  11. Training – Jesus trained His disciples for ministry by giving them opportunities to put into practice the things they had seen and heard from Jesus Himself.  A disciple’s training was in stages: (1) listening/observing, (2) practicing while the Master listens/observes and (3) being sent out on your own to make more disciples. In Luke 9:1-27, we see Jesus sending out the disciples to proclaim the Gospel. Scripture teaches that Jesus gave them power and authority.  What a beautiful picture of our role as parents!  From the day our children are born, we are training them to one day be sent out with power and authority to proclaim the Gospel.

    And He called the twelve together, and gave them power and authority over all the demons and to heal diseases.  
    And He sent them out to proclaim the kingdom of God and to perform healing…  (Luke 9:1-2)

  12. Showing Compassion – Jesus was known for being a man of great compassion.  He felt compassion to His followers physical needs like when they were hungry (Matthew 15:32), but He also had compassion for their emotional needs (Luke 7:13).

    And Jesus called His disciples to Him, and said, “I feel compassion for the people, because they have remained with Me now three days and have nothing to eat; and I do not want to send them away hungry, for they might faint on the way.”  (Matthew 15:32)
    And when the Lord saw her, he had compassion on her and said to her, “Do not weep.”  (Luke 7:13)

REFLECTION QUESTIONS
(You may need to ask your children for their help on these)

1. How would our parenting transform if we sought to disciple and discipline our children the way that Jesus did?

2. What am I teaching my children?

3. How am I modeling Christlike attitudes and behaviors for my children?

4. What example do I set for my children in dealing with their attitudes and behaviors?

5. Am I “flaunting my authority” over my children like worldly leaders do?  Or am I seeking to serve my children as Jesus served His disciples?

6. When was the last time that I asked my children for forgiveness?

7. Do my children know and believe that they are completely forgiven by God and by me?  Or are there certain “sins” or “behaviors” that I continually bring up over and over?

8. What motivates forgiveness in our home: fear of punishment or love for the individual I have offended?

9. How can I love my child in the midst of their sadness, anger, frustration, etc.?

10. What does it look like to live out 1 Corinthians 13 as a parent with my child?

11. Would my children consider me to be a patient parent or an impatient parent?  (ASK THEM!)

12. How do my children feel when I am impatient with them?  (ASK THEM!)

13. How do I feel when others are impatient with me?

14. What is a situation in which I am tempted to be impatient with my children?  What changes can I make to my behavior and attitude in order to remain patient and calm?

15. How do I extend grace to my children?

16. Do I rebuke my children for differences of opinion/preference?  Or do I rebuke my children in love because of their sin against God?

17. What beliefs am I correcting in my children?

18. What behaviors am I correcting in my children?

19. How am I correcting sinful beliefs and behaviors?

20. Are my instructions to my children specific and clear?

21. How do I respond when my children do not follow my instructions?

22. How am I training my children to be “sent out”?

23. In what areas do I need to give my children power and authority?

24. How can I respond to my children’s physical needs with compassion?

25. How can I respond to my children’s emotional needs with compassion?

26. In what ways could I represent Jesus more to my children?  (ASK THEM!)

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Part 7: How Does God Discipline?

The first time the word “discipline” is found in the Bible is in Deuteronomy 4:36.

Out of the heavens He let you hear His voice to discipline you;
and on earth He let you see His great fire, and you heard His words from the midst of the fire.

God disciplined the Jews by letting them HEAR his voice. In English, the word “discipline” connotes physical punishment.  However in Hebrew, the word “yacar” means to teach or instruct.  The emphasis is on verbal teaching or instruction.

God also disciplined (taught/instructed) the Jews by letting them SEE.

Know this day that I am not speaking with your sons who have not known and
who have not seen the discipline of the LORD your God
– His greatness,
His mighty hand and His outstretched arm,
and His signs
and His works
which He did in the midst of Egypt to Pharaoh the king of Egypt and to all his land; (Deuteronomy 11:2-3)

Scripture teaches that they SAW His discipline. What did they see? They saw God’s greatness, His mighty hand, His outstretched arm, His signs and His works throughout Egypt that God did to judge Egypt and to set the Jews free.

Let’s examine another commonly quoted passage replacing the word “discipline” with its true Hebrew meaning of “teaching/instruction.”

Hebrews 12:5-11
And have you forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as sons? “My son, do not regard lightly the [teaching or instruction] of the Lord, nor be weary when reproved [convicted] by him. For the Lord [teaches or instructs] the one he loves, and chastises every son whom he receives.” It is for [teaching and instruction] that you have to endure. God is treating you as sons. For what son is there whom his father does not [teach or instruct]? If you are left without [instruction], in which all have participated, then you are illegitimate children and not sons. Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who [taught and instructed] us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

This passage makes complete sense when reading it in light of the knowledge that we should understand Hebrew discipline as verbal teaching and instruction. Just as God teaches and instructs us, we should also teach and instruct our children.

 

 

 

 

What can we learn from other passages of Scripture about the true nature of God’s discipline?

But to the wicked God says, “What right have you to tell of My statutes And to take My covenant in your mouth? “For you hate discipline, And you cast My words behind you. (Psalm 50:16-17)

Again, notice the connection between DISCIPLINE and God’s Words. The wicked who hated God’s discipline cast aside His words. It would not make any sense to interpret discipline in this passage as physical punishment.

 

For the commandment is a lamp and the teaching is light;
And reproofs [correction] for discipline [teaching] are the way of life.
(Proverbs 6:23)

Again we see that it is through correction that we are taught the right way to live. Commandments and teaching are intimately connected to reproof and discipline.

 

Whoever loves discipline loves knowledge,
But he who hates reproof is stupid.
(Proverbs 12:1)

Would this verse make any sense if discipline referred to physical punishment? Not at all. But when we read this scripture in light of its true meaning, it makes perfect sense! Whoever loves teaching and instruction loves knowledge, but he who hates correction is stupid.

 

“Behold, how happy is the man whom God reproves,
So do not despise the discipline of the Almighty.
(Job 5:17)

This verse would also not make any sense if reproof and discipline are simply meant to be physical punishment. We also see a clear instruction to not despise the teaching and instruction of the LORD. The word “despise” is most often translated as “reject.” Do not reject the teaching of the LORD.

My son, do not despise the Lord’s discipline
or be weary of his reproof,
(Proverbs 3:11)

Another instance in which we see a command to not despise [reject] the LORD’s discipline [teaching]. It would not make sense to interpret this passage as a command to not “reject physical punishment.” Instead, we are commanded to heed the teaching and instruction of the LORD.

 

Poverty and shame will come to him who neglects discipline,
But he who regards reproof will be honored.
(Proverbs 13:18)

The word “neglects” in this verse means “to ignore.” It makes sense to say that poverty and shame will come to someone who ignores instruction. But the person who regards [listens to] correction will be honored.

 

A fool rejects his father’s discipline,
But he who regards reproof is sensible.
(Proverbs 15:5)

This verse is an example of antithetical parallelism in the book of Proverbs in which the first portion of the verse is meant to serve as the antithesis – or direct contrast – to the second portion of the verse. We can clearly see that this verse not referring to physical punishment. The author is contrasting a fool that rejects his father’s teaching and instruction with one who listens to his father’s correction and is wise.

 

He who neglects discipline despises himself,
But he who listens to reproof acquires understanding.
(Proverbs 15:32)

If I neglect spanking, I despise myself? That makes no sense. But the one who neglects teaching and instruction? That would be someone who despises himself. The one who LISTENS to reproof acquires understanding. Again we see the connection between discipline and reproof and WORDS – not actions.

 

Understanding is a fountain of life to one who has it,
But the discipline of fools is folly.
(Proverbs 16:22)

Here we see another example of antithetical parallelism in the book of Proverbs. This is a clear example of a comparison of the wisdom of understanding and the foolishness of the teaching of fools.

 

Discipline your son while there is hope,
And do not desire his death.
(Proverbs 19:18)

Are you getting it yet? Now can you read this verse and clearly see what this Proverb is trying to teach us?

 

Listen to counsel and accept discipline,
That you may be wise the rest of your days.
(Proverbs 19:20)

LISTEN to counsel (words) and accept discipline (physical discipline?) so that you may be WISE. Would it make sense to interpret this verse as accepting physical punishment in order to be wise? The passage is clearly speaking of accepting instruction so that we may be wise.

 

Cease listening, my son, to discipline,
And you will stray from the words of knowledge.
(Proverbs 19:27)

In this verse, we learn that we can stop LISTENING to discipline. Discipline simply cannot be interpreted as physical punishment.

 

Apply your heart to discipline
And your ears to words of knowledge.
(Proverbs 23:12)

Another parallel passage in Proverbs teaching us to apply our HEARTS and our EARS to instruction and to knowledge.

 

Those whom I love, I reprove and discipline;
therefore be zealous and repent.
(Revelation 3:19)

God teaches and convicts those whom He loves. Something interesting about this verse is that the word “zealous” is the Greek word “zelos” which means “excitement of mind” and the word “repent” is the Greek word “metanoeo” which means “to change one’s mind.” The verse is literally saying that because God teaches and convicts those He loves, we should be excited and change our minds.

 

 

 

God is described as our Father. However, God not only teaches and instructs us. There are almost 100 passages of Scripture that refer to God’s compassion upon us as His children.

Just as a father has compassion on his children,
So the LORD has compassion on those who fear Him.
(Psalm 103:13)

This word to “have compassion” means “to love deeply and to have mercy.” God, as our Father, has compassion and mercy on us, and He loves us deeply!

 

You, O LORD, will not withhold Your compassion from me;
Your lovingkindness and Your truth will continually preserve me.
(Psalm 40:11)

This is such an amazing verse! We see three attributes of God that “continually preserve us:” His compassion, His lovingkindness and His truth. Likewise, we should parent with compassion, lovingkindness and truth.

“Can a woman forget her nursing child
And have no compassion on the son of her womb?
Even these may forget, but I will not forget you.
(Isaiah 49:15)

I love the imagery of this verse! God promises that He will not forget us, but will instead have compassion on us.

 

In an outburst of anger I hid My face from you for a moment,
But with everlasting lovingkindness I will have compassion on you,”
Says the LORD your Redeemer.
(Isaiah 54:8)

Notice that it was in ANGER that God HID from us, but His lovingkindness brought us back into fellowship with Him as He had compassion on us.

 

 

REFLECTION QUESTIONS

  1. What is the Hebrew concept of “discipline”?
  2. How does the Hebrew concept of discipline differ from the Western view of discipline?
  3. How does God discipline His children?
  4. How did your parents teach and instruct you?
  5. When was a time when your parents showed you compassion? How did you respond?
  6. How did your parents respond to you when they were angry? What impact did their anger have on your relationship with them?
  7. How have you responded to your children in anger? What was the impact of your anger on your children? What was the impact of your anger on you?
  8. What would it look like to continually and intentionally draw our children back into fellowship with us through lovingkindness and compassion?
  9. When is a time that you would typically respond to your children in anger? How can you plan to show them compassion instead?
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Part 6: What Is Biblical Discipline?

What words are associated with Biblical discipline?

There are a variety of terms used in Scripture in regards to discipline, but are we incorrectly understanding these words through our own cultural lens? I decided to look up each of these words in the dictionary in order to have a better understanding of their true meaning.

Discipline: training to act in accordance with rules; activity that develops or improves a skill; to bring to a state of order and obedience by training

Proverbs 19:18
Discipline your son, for there is hope; do not set your heart on putting him to death.

Reproof: to criticize or correct, especially gently

Proverbs 29:15
The rod and reproof give wisdom, but a child left to himself brings shame to his mother.

Train: to develop or form the habits, thoughts or behavior by discipline and instruction; to make proficient by instruction and practice

Proverbs 22:6
Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.

Instruct: to impart knowledge; to furnish with knowledge, to teach, to educate

Ephesians 6:4
Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord.

Teach: to impart knowledge or skill

Deuteronomy 6:7
You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise.

Correct: to point out errors or faults

Proverbs 29:17
Correct your son, and he will give you comfort; He will also delight your soul.

The majority of these terms emphasize verbal correction – NOT physical correction.

It’s interesting to note that Scripture also indicates that the Word of God does ALL of these things!

All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable
for teaching,
for reproof,
for correction,
for training in righteousness;
so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work.

2 Timothy 3:16-17

Now that we know what Biblical discipline means, let’s explore how we should discipline by looking at the only perfect Father – our Heavenly Father.

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