Parenting, spanking

Part 7: How Does God Discipline?

The first time the word “discipline” is found in the Bible is in Deuteronomy 4:36.

Out of the heavens He let you hear His voice to discipline you;
and on earth He let you see His great fire, and you heard His words from the midst of the fire.

God disciplined the Jews by letting them HEAR his voice. In English, the word “discipline” connotes physical punishment.  However in Hebrew, the word “yacar” means to teach or instruct.  The emphasis is on verbal teaching or instruction.

God also disciplined (taught/instructed) the Jews by letting them SEE.

Know this day that I am not speaking with your sons who have not known and
who have not seen the discipline of the LORD your God
– His greatness,
His mighty hand and His outstretched arm,
and His signs
and His works
which He did in the midst of Egypt to Pharaoh the king of Egypt and to all his land; (Deuteronomy 11:2-3)

Scripture teaches that they SAW His discipline. What did they see? They saw God’s greatness, His mighty hand, His outstretched arm, His signs and His works throughout Egypt that God did to judge Egypt and to set the Jews free.

Let’s examine another commonly quoted passage replacing the word “discipline” with its true Hebrew meaning of “teaching/instruction.”

Hebrews 12:5-11
And have you forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as sons? “My son, do not regard lightly the [teaching or instruction] of the Lord, nor be weary when reproved [convicted] by him. For the Lord [teaches or instructs] the one he loves, and chastises every son whom he receives.” It is for [teaching and instruction] that you have to endure. God is treating you as sons. For what son is there whom his father does not [teach or instruct]? If you are left without [instruction], in which all have participated, then you are illegitimate children and not sons. Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who [taught and instructed] us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live?

This passage makes complete sense when reading it in light of the knowledge that we should understand Hebrew discipline as verbal teaching and instruction. Just as God teaches and instructs us, we should also teach and instruct our children.

 

 

 

 

What can we learn from other passages of Scripture about the true nature of God’s discipline?

But to the wicked God says, “What right have you to tell of My statutes And to take My covenant in your mouth? “For you hate discipline, And you cast My words behind you. (Psalm 50:16-17)

Again, notice the connection between DISCIPLINE and God’s Words. The wicked who hated God’s discipline cast aside His words. It would not make any sense to interpret discipline in this passage as physical punishment.

 

For the commandment is a lamp and the teaching is light;
And reproofs [correction] for discipline [teaching] are the way of life.
(Proverbs 6:23)

Again we see that it is through correction that we are taught the right way to live. Commandments and teaching are intimately connected to reproof and discipline.

 

Whoever loves discipline loves knowledge,
But he who hates reproof is stupid.
(Proverbs 12:1)

Would this verse make any sense if discipline referred to physical punishment? Not at all. But when we read this scripture in light of its true meaning, it makes perfect sense! Whoever loves teaching and instruction loves knowledge, but he who hates correction is stupid.

 

“Behold, how happy is the man whom God reproves,
So do not despise the discipline of the Almighty.
(Job 5:17)

This verse would also not make any sense if reproof and discipline are simply meant to be physical punishment. We also see a clear instruction to not despise the teaching and instruction of the LORD. The word “despise” is most often translated as “reject.” Do not reject the teaching of the LORD.

My son, do not despise the Lord’s discipline
or be weary of his reproof,
(Proverbs 3:11)

Another instance in which we see a command to not despise [reject] the LORD’s discipline [teaching]. It would not make sense to interpret this passage as a command to not “reject physical punishment.” Instead, we are commanded to heed the teaching and instruction of the LORD.

 

Poverty and shame will come to him who neglects discipline,
But he who regards reproof will be honored.
(Proverbs 13:18)

The word “neglects” in this verse means “to ignore.” It makes sense to say that poverty and shame will come to someone who ignores instruction. But the person who regards [listens to] correction will be honored.

 

A fool rejects his father’s discipline,
But he who regards reproof is sensible.
(Proverbs 15:5)

This verse is an example of antithetical parallelism in the book of Proverbs in which the first portion of the verse is meant to serve as the antithesis – or direct contrast – to the second portion of the verse. We can clearly see that this verse not referring to physical punishment. The author is contrasting a fool that rejects his father’s teaching and instruction with one who listens to his father’s correction and is wise.

 

He who neglects discipline despises himself,
But he who listens to reproof acquires understanding.
(Proverbs 15:32)

If I neglect spanking, I despise myself? That makes no sense. But the one who neglects teaching and instruction? That would be someone who despises himself. The one who LISTENS to reproof acquires understanding. Again we see the connection between discipline and reproof and WORDS – not actions.

 

Understanding is a fountain of life to one who has it,
But the discipline of fools is folly.
(Proverbs 16:22)

Here we see another example of antithetical parallelism in the book of Proverbs. This is a clear example of a comparison of the wisdom of understanding and the foolishness of the teaching of fools.

 

Discipline your son while there is hope,
And do not desire his death.
(Proverbs 19:18)

Are you getting it yet? Now can you read this verse and clearly see what this Proverb is trying to teach us?

 

Listen to counsel and accept discipline,
That you may be wise the rest of your days.
(Proverbs 19:20)

LISTEN to counsel (words) and accept discipline (physical discipline?) so that you may be WISE. Would it make sense to interpret this verse as accepting physical punishment in order to be wise? The passage is clearly speaking of accepting instruction so that we may be wise.

 

Cease listening, my son, to discipline,
And you will stray from the words of knowledge.
(Proverbs 19:27)

In this verse, we learn that we can stop LISTENING to discipline. Discipline simply cannot be interpreted as physical punishment.

 

Apply your heart to discipline
And your ears to words of knowledge.
(Proverbs 23:12)

Another parallel passage in Proverbs teaching us to apply our HEARTS and our EARS to instruction and to knowledge.

 

Those whom I love, I reprove and discipline;
therefore be zealous and repent.
(Revelation 3:19)

God teaches and convicts those whom He loves. Something interesting about this verse is that the word “zealous” is the Greek word “zelos” which means “excitement of mind” and the word “repent” is the Greek word “metanoeo” which means “to change one’s mind.” The verse is literally saying that because God teaches and convicts those He loves, we should be excited and change our minds.

 

 

 

God is described as our Father. However, God not only teaches and instructs us. There are almost 100 passages of Scripture that refer to God’s compassion upon us as His children.

Just as a father has compassion on his children,
So the LORD has compassion on those who fear Him.
(Psalm 103:13)

This word to “have compassion” means “to love deeply and to have mercy.” God, as our Father, has compassion and mercy on us, and He loves us deeply!

 

You, O LORD, will not withhold Your compassion from me;
Your lovingkindness and Your truth will continually preserve me.
(Psalm 40:11)

This is such an amazing verse! We see three attributes of God that “continually preserve us:” His compassion, His lovingkindness and His truth. Likewise, we should parent with compassion, lovingkindness and truth.

“Can a woman forget her nursing child
And have no compassion on the son of her womb?
Even these may forget, but I will not forget you.
(Isaiah 49:15)

I love the imagery of this verse! God promises that He will not forget us, but will instead have compassion on us.

 

In an outburst of anger I hid My face from you for a moment,
But with everlasting lovingkindness I will have compassion on you,”
Says the LORD your Redeemer.
(Isaiah 54:8)

Notice that it was in ANGER that God HID from us, but His lovingkindness brought us back into fellowship with Him as He had compassion on us.

 

 

REFLECTION QUESTIONS

  1. What is the Hebrew concept of “discipline”?
  2. How does the Hebrew concept of discipline differ from the Western view of discipline?
  3. How does God discipline His children?
  4. How did your parents teach and instruct you?
  5. When was a time when your parents showed you compassion? How did you respond?
  6. How did your parents respond to you when they were angry? What impact did their anger have on your relationship with them?
  7. How have you responded to your children in anger? What was the impact of your anger on your children? What was the impact of your anger on you?
  8. What would it look like to continually and intentionally draw our children back into fellowship with us through lovingkindness and compassion?
  9. When is a time that you would typically respond to your children in anger? How can you plan to show them compassion instead?
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Parenting, spanking

Part 6: What Is Biblical Discipline?

What words are associated with Biblical discipline?

There are a variety of terms used in Scripture in regards to discipline, but are we incorrectly understanding these words through our own cultural lens? I decided to look up each of these words in the dictionary in order to have a better understanding of their true meaning.

Discipline: training to act in accordance with rules; activity that develops or improves a skill; to bring to a state of order and obedience by training

Proverbs 19:18
Discipline your son, for there is hope; do not set your heart on putting him to death.

Reproof: to criticize or correct, especially gently

Proverbs 29:15
The rod and reproof give wisdom, but a child left to himself brings shame to his mother.

Train: to develop or form the habits, thoughts or behavior by discipline and instruction; to make proficient by instruction and practice

Proverbs 22:6
Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.

Instruct: to impart knowledge; to furnish with knowledge, to teach, to educate

Ephesians 6:4
Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord.

Teach: to impart knowledge or skill

Deuteronomy 6:7
You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise.

Correct: to point out errors or faults

Proverbs 29:17
Correct your son, and he will give you comfort; He will also delight your soul.

The majority of these terms emphasize verbal correction – NOT physical correction.

It’s interesting to note that Scripture also indicates that the Word of God does ALL of these things!

All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable
for teaching,
for reproof,
for correction,
for training in righteousness;
so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work.

2 Timothy 3:16-17

Now that we know what Biblical discipline means, let’s explore how we should discipline by looking at the only perfect Father – our Heavenly Father.

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Part 5: Who is “the child” in Proverbs?

He who withholds his rod hates his son,
But he who loves him disciplines him diligently.
Proverbs 13:24

Foolishness is bound up in the heart of a child;
The rod of discipline will remove it far from him.
Proverbs 22:15

Do not hold back discipline from the child,
although you strike him with the rod, he will not die.
You shall strike him with the rod and rescue his soul from Sheol
Proverbs 23:13-14

 The rod and reproof give wisdom,
But a child who gets his own way brings shame to his mother.
Proverbs 29:15

That’s it. An entire parenting philosophy that has lasted hundreds of years has stemmed from these four verses from a book of poetry.

To summarize what we have learned thus far in this series:

  1. “Spanking” is not found anywhere in the Word of God, so we are either not obeying these verses correctly or we are not understanding these verses correctly.
  2. The “rod” in these verses is a figurative rod symbolizing authority.
  3. The book of Proverbs is a collection of wisdom literature written by a King for his son in order to prepare him to take over the throne and is intended to be read as a collection of wise sayings (not commands) that are generally true (not always true).

Now, we will take a deeper look at the object of this discipline – the “child” – in order to see who was intended to be the receiver of the “rod.”

One of the greatest books that I have read on this subject is Thy Rod and Thy Staff They Comfort Me by Samuel Martin. (You can read the book for free here!)

Much like in English, Hebrew has nine different words that represent nine different stages of a person’s growth.

If you went to visit a friend who had two sons – a toddler and a teenager – and asked her, “Is your child still in diapers?” She would easily understand that you were referring to her toddler and not her teenager.

Similarly, if you were to say to her, “Your son can move my car from the driveway,” she wouldn’t hand the keys to her toddler.

Likewise, if she were to say, “The toddler can drink juice, but the teenager may have a soda for lunch,” I highly doubt that you would be confused as to which one should drink juice and which one should drink soda.

The reason why we understand these terms easily is because while both of these boys are her children and both of these boys are her sons, the words “toddler” and “teenager” imply totally different stages of growth.

Below is a chart that represents the various terms used in Hebrew to represent the different stages of growth from infancy through adulthood.

Male

Female

Root

Meaning

English

Age

yeled

yaldah

yalad

“To give birth”

newborn

0-1 month

yonek

yanak

“To suck; to nurse”

infant

1-12 months

olel

olal

“To ask bread”

Not yet weaned child that eats solid food

1-3 years

gamul

gamal

“To wean; to complete”

Weaned child

3-4 years

taph

taf

“To cling; to swaddle”

Child close to mother

4-6 years

elem

almah

“To become firm”

Pre-Teen

7-11 years

na’ar

na’arah

“To shake off”

Teenager (unmarried man/woman)

12-18 years

bthulah

“Virgin”

Unmarried woman right before marriage

bachur

bachurah

“Ripened one”

Ready to be married man/woman

ish

isha

Man/Woman

In order to accurately interpret and apply the verses in Proverbs, it is important to understand which stage of development is being referred to in the verses above so we do not end up “giving soda to a toddler.”

Proverbs 13:24 uses the Hebrew word “ben” which is a general term meaning “son.” The other three verses listed above use the more specific Hebrew word, “na’ar” – which as you can see from the chart indicates a young man of the ages 12-18. (The word na’ar is also translated as a “male servant.”) Logic would follow that we would use the most specific term in order to determine who is being referred to in these passages.

So if spanking advocates truly want to hit children “the way the Bible commands,” then according to Scripture, they should not start hitting children with a rod until the child is at least 12 years of age (a legal adult in Jewish culture).

This simple truth utterly destroys the “Biblical” basis for spanking as is done in our “modern” culture which is almost exclusively aimed at children under the age of 12.

Just because I am not the type to “believe whatever you hear or read,” I asked one of my friends who was born and raised in Israel and is now working as a Hebrew teacher at a Jewish school, “What is a na’ar?” I did not provide her any context for the question – just simply wanted to get her instant answer.

She replied, “A na’ar is a boy that is like 17 – not a little boy, but not really mature like a man either.”

Just to be sure, I asked her to clarify, “Is Sophia (my 3 year old daughter) a na’ar?”

To which she laughed and said, “No!”

Again, I asked her, “Is your son (an 8 year old boy) a na’ar?”

And again, she replied, “No. A na’ar is like 15 or 16 or 17. My son is not a na’ar yet.”

If people knew and understood the meaning of this one crucial word in Hebrew as easily as native speakers of Hebrew do, the case for spanking would certainly be closed.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

  1. Who is the “child” mentioned in the verses used to advocate for hitting children?
  2. How does understanding the connotations for the Hebrew word na’ar impact our understanding of these verses?
  3. If there is no biblical basis for hitting a child under the age of 12, on what basis are we advocating for hitting our children as a method of discipline and correction?
  4. How are we being influenced by our traditions and our culture more than by the Word of God?
  5. What is the significance that King Solomon wrote these verses to his son in preparation for becoming King?

Another interesting thing to note about these verses is that they make frequent connection between “the rod” and “discipline.”  Let’s explore what Biblical discipline really means.

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Part 4: How Should We Read The Book of Proverbs?

How should we read/interpret the Books of Poetry in the Bible?

(Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon)

If we are going to accurately interpret and apply the four verses from the book of Proverbs used in defense of the practice of spanking, it is important to understand the purpose and intention of the book of Proverbs as a whole.

  1. Who wrote the book of Proverbs? (mostly) King SolomonThe proverbs of Solomon, son of David, king of Israel: (Proverbs 1:1)
  2. For whom was the book of Proverbs written? King Solomon’s son as preparation for his time as KingHear, my son, your father’s instruction,
    and forsake not your mother’s teaching, (Proverbs 1:8)
  3. Why was the book of Proverbs written?To know wisdom and instruction,
    to understand words of insight,
    to receive instruction in wise dealing,
    in righteousness, justice, and equity;
    to give prudence to the simple,
    knowledge and discretion to the youth—
    Let the wise hear and increase in learning,
    and the one who understands obtain guidance,
    to understand a proverb and a saying,
    the words of the wise and their riddles. (Proverbs 1:2-6)

Proverbs are WISDOM LITERATURE and are part of the BOOKS OF POETRY in the Bible. As such, they incorporate symbols, metaphors and other figurative literary devices. As “wisdom,” they are NOT commands from the LORD, but rather recorded wise sayings from King Solomon.

Proverbs are:

  • Principles
  • Wise Sayings
  • Memorable
  • Usually figurative
  • Generally true – not necessarily true

Proverbs are NOT:

  • Commands from the LORD
  • Guarantees
  • Promises
  • Usually literal
  • Applicable or true in every circumstance or situation

Other Proverbs Verses We Don’t Read Literally

For they eat the bread of wickedness and drink the wine of violence. (Proverbs 4:17)

Are they LITERALLY eating bread of wickedness? Are they LITERALLY drinking wine of violence? No, of course not.

In the mouth of the foolish is a rod of pride: but the lips of the wise shall preserve them. (Proverbs 14:3)

This Proverbs also includes a reference to a “rod.” It is clear that this “rod” is NOT a literal rod but rather a symbol of pride. Or do you think a fool has a LITERAL rod of pride in his mouth?

From the fruit of a man’s mouth his stomach is satisfied; he is satisfied by the yield of his lips. (Proverbs 18:20)

If we take this Proverbs literally, there is no reason for us to eat since we should be satisfied by our words. Do our mouths literally produce fruit? Obviously not. These Proverbs were not intended to be read literally.

A hard worker has plenty of food, but a person who chases fantasies has no sense. (Proverbs 12:11)

Do you know any hard workers who do not have plenty of food? As someone who has worked in third world countries for most of my life, some of the hardest working people I know are often those who struggle daily with hunger and providing basic food necessities for their families. This proverb is not a promise.

Put a knife to your throat if you are given to appetite. (Proverbs 23:2)

If we are going to assume that the verses that supposedly promote spanking are commands from God, than we should also interpret this as a command from God, but I don’t see anyone in church putting a literal knife to their throat for eating too much. Clearly this is verse NOT a command nor is it meant to be read literally.

Answer not a fool according to his folly,
lest you be like him yourself.
Answer a fool according to his folly,
lest he be wise in his own eyes. (Proverbs 26:4-5)

So… which is it?

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

  1. What are some other verses in the book of Proverbs that we should not read literally?
  2. What are some other verses in the book of Proverbs that we should not read as commands?
  3. What are some other verses in the book of Proverbs that we should not read as promises?
  4. What are some other verses in the book of Proverbs that we should not read as guarantees?
  5. If we know the book of Proverbs was written by King Solomon for his son (who would be the future king), how might this knowledge shape our understanding of the four “spanking verses”?
  6. If we know the book of Proverbs is almost always meant to be read figuratively and not literally, how might this knowledge impact our understanding of the four “spanking verses”?

Since we know we are to read the book of Proverbs as a figurative book and we are to read the word “rod” as a figurative rod, let’s dive deeper into the four verses that people use to support spanking in order to understand their true meaning and application.

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Part 3: What is the Biblical “rod”?

What is the Biblical “Rod”?


Image by Crystal Lutton
(http://crystallutton.com/you-keep-using-that-verse/)

According to Strong’s Concordance, the “Rod” referred to in Proverbs is the Hebrew word “Shebet.”

  • The word “shebet” is used 191 times in the Bible
  • 76% of those times, “shebet” is translated as “tribe” or “tribes” or “half-tribe”
  • Only 14% of the time, “shebet” is translated as “rod”
  • “Shebet” is also translated as:
    • correction 1 time
    • scepters 1 time
    • spears 1 time
    • staff 1 time
    • club 4 times
    • scepter 11 times
    • half-tribe* 22 times
    • rod 27 times
    • tribe 40 times
    • tribes 83 times
  • “Shebet” is defined as:
    • a rod or staff
    • the shaft of a spear or dart
    • a club that shepherds used to protect the sheep
    • a truncheon or scepter as a symbol of authority
    • a clan or tribe (usually of the nation of Israel)
  • “Shebet” is used in the book of Psalms 11 times
    • Figurative symbol of authority (evil, severe authority as well as God’s authority)
      • Psalm 2:9 – ‘You shall break them with a rod of iron, You shall shatter them like earthenware .’ “
      • Psalm 45:6 – Your throne, O God, is forever and ever; A scepter of uprightness is the scepter of Your kingdom.
      • Psalm 89:32 – Then I will punish their transgression with the rod And their iniquity with stripes.
      • Psalm 125:3 – For the scepter of wickedness shall not rest upon the land of the righteous, So that the righteous will not put forth their hands to do wrong.
    • Representing the nation of Israel, God’s chosen people
      • Psalm 74:2 – Remember Your congregation, which You have purchased of old, Which You have redeemed to be the tribe of Your inheritance; And this Mount Zion, where You have dwelt.
      • Psalm 78:55 – He also drove out the nations before them And apportioned them for an inheritance by measurement, And made the tribes of Israel dwell in their tents.
      • Psalm 78:67-68 – He also rejected the tent of Joseph, And did not choose the tribe of Ephraim, But chose the tribe of Judah, Mount Zion which He loved.
      • Psalm 105:37 – Then He brought them out with silver and gold, And among His tribes there was not one who stumbled.
    • Figurative image representing God as our Shepherd
      • Proverbs 23:4 – Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for You are with me; Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me
      • It is interesting to note that the rod AND the staff are intended to comfort us – not beat us. A shepherd used the rod to protect the sheep from any enemies that would seek to attack. The staff was used to gently guide the sheep along the path they should follow.
  • “Shebet” is used in the book of Proverbs 8 times
    • The Four “Spanking Verses”
      • Proverbs 13:24 – He who withholds his rod hates his son, But he who loves him disciplines him diligently.
      • Proverbs 22:15 – Foolishness is bound up in the heart of a child; The rod of discipline will remove it far from him.
      • Proverbs 23:13-14 – Do not hold back discipline from the child, although you strike him with the rod, he will not die. You shall strike him with the rod and rescue his soul from Sheol
      • Proverbs 29:15 – The rod and reproof give wisdom, But a child who gets his own way brings shame to his mother.
    • Two Verses on Corporal Punishment of Fools
      • Proverbs 10:13 – On the lips of the discerning, wisdom is found, But a rod is for the back of him who lacks understanding.
      • Proverbs 26:3 – A whip is for the horse, a bridle for the donkey, And a rod for the back of fools.
    • A figurative symbol of oppressive authority
      • Proverb 22:8 – He who sows iniquity will reap vanity, And the rod of his fury will perish.

So from this simple word study, we have learned that:

  1. The “Shebet” is a symbol of authority.
  2. The “Shebet” was also used by shepherds to protect the sheep from enemies and to guide the sheep gently along the path they should follow.
  3. The “Shebet” is used in Wisdom Literature as a FIGURATIVE image – not a LITERAL one.

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

  1. What is the significance of the “rod” being used as a figurative image and not a literal one?
  2. What is the impact of reading the four “spanking verses” in Proverbs as a figurative rod and not a literal one?
  3. What do you think the “rod” could be symbolizing in those four verses?

Since the only verses in the Bible that refer to spanking are the four verses found in the book of Proverbs, it would be helpful to examine the book of Proverbs as a whole to better understand how we should read this book of Wisdom Literature.

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Part 2: What does the Bible say about “spanking”?

Since I was spanked as a little girl, it was only natural of course that I would plan to do the same with my own children. After all, I turned out AMAZING! However, when I became a mom, I realized that I had no idea how or when to administer a spanking.

Are there certain sins that just get an automatic spanking?
Should I spank her for hitting another kid?
Do I warn her first and then if she deliberately disobeys again, I spank her?
How many times should I spank her?
Do I use my hand or a spoon or a branch or a belt or a shoe?
How young is too young?
How old is too old?
Is this the best form of discipline or merely a last resort?

I decided to go back to the original source – the Bible – in order to make sure that I was really obeying God’s Word regarding how and when to spank my children. I began to do some research in an attempt to answer all these questions that I had looming in my mind.

The first thing I noticed is that spanking is NOT in the Bible. The word “spank” is found NOWHERE in the Holy Scriptures. “Spanking” is a euphemism. Words matter, so let’s call it what it is – hitting.  Spanking is hitting a child.

Despite the fact that the word “spanking” cannot be found in Scripture, there is wide disagreement between how and when to implement this teaching even among those who believe the Bible advocates for hitting a child. If you were to pick up any two books written by “Christian authorities” or talk to any two Christian parents on the subject, you will find a number of conflicting recommendations:

“Don’t spank a child over 5.”
“Don’t spank a child over age 12.”
“Begin spanking before a child’s first birthday.”
“Do not begin spanking until a child is at least 3 years old.”
“Never spank with your hand – hands are only to be associated with love.”
“Spank with your hand so that you will know if you are spanking too hard or too soft.”
“Children have extra padding on the butt which God put there for spanking.”
“A slap on the hands, butt or thighs will surely teach them!”
“Never spank in anger.”
“Only give two swats.”
“Spank until they produce real tears and genuine repentance.”

I’m sure I could record hundreds of other pieces of advice from various parents and scholars, but if in the end all of these people are claiming the ultimate authority on the matter is the Word of God, then we should go back to the Word of God for the answers. Here is what the Bible teaches:

  1. There is NO Biblical upper age limit. The only limit given in the Bible is that there should be no more than 40 stripes (for an adult). The Bible only references using corporal punishment in regards to legal adults (12 and older)
    Forty stripes
    may be given him, but not more, lest, if one should go on to beat him with more stripes than these, your brother be degraded in your sight. (Deuteronomy 25:3)
  2. The Bible specifies that the “rod” is for the BACK (not the BUTT).
    A whip for the horse, a bridle for the donkey,

    and a rod for the back of fools. (Proverbs 26:3)On the lips of him who has understanding, wisdom is found,
    but a rod is for the back of him who lacks sense. (Proverbs 10:13)
  3. The Bible specifies using only TWO items for corporal punishment – the rod and the whip (not the hand or belt).
    Whoever spares the rod hates his son, but he who loves him is diligent to discipline him. (Proverbs 13:24)Do not withhold discipline from a child; if you strike him with a rod, he will not die. If you strike him with the rod, you will save his soul from Sheol.  (Proverbs 23:13-14)Folly is bound up in the heart of a child, but the rod of discipline drives it far from him.  (Proverbs 22:15)The rod and reproof give wisdom, but a child left to himself brings shame to his mother.  (Proverbs 29:15)

     

  4. The Bible indicates that corporal punishment should be severe enough to leave a mark.
    Blows that wound [bruise] cleanse away evil; strokes [beatings, slaughter] make clean the innermost parts. (Proverbs 20:30)

 

So if we are going to really obey the Bible in regards to this matter,
we should beat our children on the back with a rod until they bruise regardless of age.

I do not know of any Christian who would advocate for doing that. We cannot claim to support a parenting philosophy that hits children as discipline based on the Bible while at the same time neglecting to obey the Word of God’s explicit teaching on the subject. We use the Bible as our excuse to hit our children without being careful to do it the way the Bible says. So either we are not doing what the Bible says or we are not understanding what the Bible says. Let’s explore together the deeper meaning of these verses by investigating what the “rod” really means.

 

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

  1. Were you hit as a child?
  2. How did your parents hit you?
  3. Why did your parents hit you?
  4. How old were you when you were first hit by your parents?
  5. How old were you when you were last hit by your parents?
  6. How did you feel before and after being hit by your parents?
  7. How did your parents decide when and how to hit you?
  8. Would you or have you hit your children?
  9. Would you or have you hit your children the way the Bible recommends? Why or why not?
  10. What is the impact of answering these questions with the word “hit” instead of the euphemism “spank”?

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Parenting, spanking

Part 1: The Only Spanking I Remember is the One I Never Got

Being raised in a “good Christian home,” my parents were firm believers in “the rod.” As a result, I have gotten more spankings in my lifetime than I could ever count! However, the only spanking that I remember is the one I never got.

I was eight years old, and once again, I had gotten in trouble. In fact, I cannot remember a day that went by where I didn’t get in trouble for one of two things: (1) fighting with my younger brother or (2) sassing my mother.

On this particularly sunny day, I had gotten in trouble for the latter. I don’t remember what exactly I said to make my mom totally lose it with me, but I do remember the shrill sound of her voice as she yelled, “Go to your room, young lady! Just you wait until your father gets home!”

I sat in my room for what felt like hours. I didn’t mean to make my mom so upset. Sometimes I would just get angry and say things that she had to know I didn’t mean. Tears started to stream down my face, and then I heard him… *clomp clomp clomp* The sound of my father’s heavy shoes as he walked down the hallway towards my room. My heart was racing with anxiety and fear. I knew my punishment was literally right around the corner.

I quickly put on the thickest pair of jeans I could find, and I closed my eyes in hopes that it would all just go away. I heard the door creak open, and I opened my eyes to see my father walking in with his burly brown belt in his hands.

He sat down on my bed holding the belt in a loop and snapping it so it would make that loud “pop” sound. To this day, that sound sends shivers down my spine. I turned my eyes to the floor and watched the tears begin to puddle by my feet.

“You know why you’re in here, don’t you?” he asked.

“Yes, sir.” I replied.

“Why?”

“I sassed my mother, sir.”

“And do you know the punishment for sassing your mother?”

I gulped and said, “Yes, sir. A spanking.”

My father was silent for a while, so I dared to lift my gaze from the floor. His tone was stern, but his eyes were kind. He looked at me with such love and said, “Honey, you know that the punishment you deserve for your sin is a spanking. But I think God wants to teach you something different today. I love you, and so today, I will take your punishment.”

He placed the belt in my trembling hands, laid face down on my bed, and pulled his shirt up to expose his bare back.  “Hit me,” he said.

“Daddy, I can’t!” I cried.

“Hit me,” he repeated.

I shook my head back and forth.  I couldn’t hit my dad.  I couldn’t let him take my punishment like that.

My father sat up again, and I threw my arms around his neck and hugged him. At this point, both of us were crying. He took the belt from my hands and laid it aside. He held tightly to both of my tiny hands, saying, “This is what Jesus did for you when He died on the cross. He loves you so much that He took the punishment that you deserved.”

This was the first time in my entire life that I understood the Gospel.

This was the first time in my entire life that I understood grace.

So many people still insist upon punishing their children with “spankings,” but what if we really believed the Gospel?

What if we gave freely of the grace that has been poured out on us?

What if we lived the reality that Jesus took ALL of our punishment on the cross and there is nothing left for us to pay?

A spanking may temporarily change behavior, but that moment of grace with my dad forever changed my life!

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

  1. When you were growing up, how did your parents punish you? What was the impact of that punishment?
  2. When was a time your parents or someone in authority showed you grace?
  3. How did you feel?
  4. How did you respond to that grace?
  5. Imagine a scenario when you would be tempted to react by punishing your child. How could you exemplify the Gospel for them instead?
  6. What would be the impact of living the Gospel before our children?

 

Check out Part 2 to see what the Bible says about spanking!

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